Check Out These Weird Engagement Superstitions

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Weddings are well known for having various traditions and superstitions associated with them (something old, new, borrowed and blue anyone?) But did you know there are also plenty of superstitions surrounding the engagement ring, the proposal, and even the diamond too? Check out this list and see if you’re guilty of any of them. Don’t worry – none of them have ever been scientifically proven so even if you’ve been supposedly cursed with bad luck, we reckon you’re probably safe.

  • If a woman who is engaged accidentally drops a knife, it’s a sign that her fiance is coming to visit her.
  • If you let someone else try on your own engagement ring, your wedding will end up never happening because the person who tried it on will steal all the happiness and luck from the bride – as well as the heart of her husband. That’s one way to ward off all those over excited friends and family members!
  • If your spouse to be proposed in public, your marriage will receive unwanted notoriety.
  • If a man encounters a snake while on his way to propose to his lady love, extremely bad luck will follow. So he should turn back and try again another day.
  • If you wear an emerald as an engagement ring, it’s bad luck and means you will die an old maid. Didn’t Jackie Kennedy have an emerald and diamond ring?!

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  • In Ancient Greece diamonds were said to protect from the Evil Eye, which was said to cause misfortune, illness, and even death. Women would wear diamonds because the sparkle would blind the eye! Blue diamonds however were too close to the eye’s colour and were to be avoided.
  • In Ancient Rome, diamonds were thought to be tears of the gods and similarly offered protection from all kinds of harm.
  • As is Friday the 13th wasn’t bad enough, apparently it’s also bad luck to purchase your engagement ring on a Friday… who knows why.
  • Indians believed they cured insanity and protected from lightning strikes, because they thought that diamonds formed when lightning hit rocks.
  • Gemstones with culets (ie ones that taper down to a point at the bottom, like the round brilliant cut) are thought by some to be bad luck because evil spirits could enter the stone through the culet and put a curse on the wearer of the ring.
  • In some mythologies cupid’s bow was tipped with a diamond, and this is what guaranteed that whoever he struck with it would fall in love.

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  • If a bride wishes her marriage to be happy and lengthy then refusing to let anyone else try on her ring (or take it off at all) isn’t the only thing she needs to worry about. If she wants to borrow jewellery to wear, she must only do so from women who have long and healthy marriages or else the negativity will transfer to her once she dons the jewels.
  • Back in the 1600s some men believed that if they placed a diamond under their pillow before bed, it would warn them if their wife was being unfaithful! They also thought a diamond would grow dim when a lie was told and sparkle bright when a truth was revealed
  • Traditionally, three-stone engagement rings symbolise the past, present and future of a relationship. So if one of the stones was lost, it was seriously bad news for the wearer.
  • Some still believe that your engagement ring should never be fully removed from your hand. Instead of taking it completely off your ring finger, you should touch another finger on your hand to it and slide the ring onto that finger instead. Makes washing your hands a little more difficult!
  • This one is more so to do with wedding bands than engagement rings, but supposedly if either the bride or groom drops the ring at the altar, they will be the first to die in the marriage. If it drops of its own accord then the groom should be the one to pick it up to counteract the bad luck (how that works is anyone’s guess).

If you can manage to avoid all of the above and somehow still have an engagement ring, then we salute you.